Day Spa Design Brief

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Day Spa Design Brief

600.00

This document sets out the architectural and interior design requirements for a spa facility, with each room/area having its own page detailing information pertaining to electrical, lighting, sound, space and FFE. This information provides the framework for an architect and design studio to design a day spa.

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Our primary goal is to create a seamless experience for the guest, which is supported by a floor plan that supports flow, operational efficiency and low noise levels, whilst maximising ROI by allocating as much possible space to revenue generating areas. Spa Consumers rate the ambience and design of a spa as the second most important factor (following customer service) when rating a spa. And 93% of Spa Consumers choose a spa based on its facilities, with ambience being the primary consideration. However, it has been found that many spa facilities score relatively low when consumers are asked what surpassed their expectations. 

Most people visit a spa to relax and escape from their everyday life and environment. Therefore the Spa design needs to offer a distinct departure from their normal surroundings, appealing to their senses and evoking a sense of tranquillity and calm. In this case the spa facility design, décor and lighting make a powerful impact. 

A successful spa design offers its guests a clean, comfortable and ambient environment that reflects the proposed spa philosophy and concept. This décor and interior style should be evident even before guests enter the spa; they should be progressively led from the everyday environment into the spa zone. 

The floor plan needs to consider the separation of the different spa areas, so that the tranquillity of quiet zones (treatment rooms and relaxation lounge area) is not compromised. 

To ensure the design reflects the concept, careful consideration has to be given to the interaction of the different spaces in the spa, observing the following: 

  • Circulation and access for guests (consideration to quiet versus social zones – sound proofing may be necessary). 

  • Circulation and access of back-of-house areas and requirements such as linen delivery and storage, staff entrance and exit (concealed entrance, out of view from guest areas, noise considered in relation to quiet guest zones). 

  • Prominence of main revenue generating areas (treatment rooms, thermal bathing areas, reception/retail space).

  • Social interaction between areas, with a balance of private space/time. 

  • Personalised, lighting, climate and audio throughout. 

  • Economy of space. 

  • Creating a space that feels intimate and exclusive.